News Bulletins

In local news:

The American Equity Underwriters, Inc. (AEU) announced that David Widener has joined the firm as director of a newly created division, AEU Claims Advisory Services. Widener joins AEU with nearly two decades of experience in the longshore claims arena, most recently as a district director with the U.S. Department of Labor, where he oversaw operations for the Houston District Office since 2012.

In national news:

The number of job openings was little changed at 7.3 million on the last business day of May, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported. Over the month, hires fell to 5.7 million and separations edged down to 5.5 million. Within separations, quits and layoffs and discharges rates were unchanged at 2.3 percent and 1.2 percent, respectively. This release includes estimates of the number and rate of job openings, hires, and separations for the nonfarm sector by industry and by four geographic regions.

Read more here.

In safety news:

OSHA is urging vigilance among employers and employees to address the types of workplace hazards that tend to peak in the summer months. Hazards related to heat exposure, falls, trenching and excavation, struck-by objects and vehicles, electrical safety, workplace violence, grain bin engulfment and other risks in agricultural operations have been at their highest in Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, and Nebraska in July, August, and September in the past three years.

Read more here.

In local news:

LWC is hosting information and orientation sessions for workers who were recently displaced by recent Waitr layoffs in Lafayette, on Thursday, July 18th, and in Lake Charles, on Tuesday, July 23th. Information covered at the orientation sessions include, LWC-facilitated re-employment services, re-employment assistance, unemployment insurance and job-search tools and materials.

More info here.

In economic news:

In June 2019, both the unemployment rate, 3.7 percent, and the number of unemployed, 6.0 million people, were little changed from May. BLS publishes six “alternative measures of labor underutilization,” known as U-1 through U-6, every month. The unemployment rate, also called U-3, is the total number of unemployed people as a percentage of the labor force. U-1 and U-2 are more narrowly defined and always lower than the U-3 rate. U-4, U-5, and U-6 are more broadly defined and always higher. In June, U-1 was at 1.3 percent and includes people unemployed 15 weeks or longer, as a percent of the civilian labor force. U-2 was at 1.7 percent and includes job losers and people who completed temporary jobs, as a percent of the civilian labor force.

Read more here.

In industry news:

The IAIABC recently announced and congratulated the eight recipients of its 2019 NextGen Awards. NextGen launched in 2017 as a way to recognize talented young professionals who are having a positive impact on workers’ compensation, making a difference within their organizations and leading the industry into the future.

See the winners here.

In industry news:

Sedgwick has signed an agreement to acquire York Risk Services Group. Following the close of the transaction, the Sedgwick family will comprise nearly 27,000 colleagues. York provides claims administration, managed care, specialized loss adjusting, pool administration and loss control solutions. It serves a variety of clients, including corporations, the insurance industry and public entities. The company has nearly 5,000 employees in more than 60 offices across the U.S., including an office in Metairie.

Read more here.

In tech news:

The latest episode of AM BestTV features The Institutes’ Marty Frappolli. He discusses the intersection between the Internet of Things (IoT), devices and data. Frappolli said insureds will benefit from connected devices, and insurers will also benefit from what they learn by deploying those devices.

Watch here.

In industry news:

Safety National announced a new webinar, Distracted Driving: Options and Actions for Commercial Auto Fleets. The event will take place on July 25, 11 AM-noon CT.

More info and registration here.

In labor news:

A new report from the National Employment Law Project (NELP) looks at the 12 cities and counties that passed a higher local minimum wage but then saw their state legislatures invalidate those laws and prohibit all local minimum wages. NELP found that close to 350,000 workers are losing nearly $1.5 billion in wages per year, with each worker losing around $4,000 annually. The affected workers are disproportionately women and people of color. They are also mainly adults, with many age 30 or older. Louisiana debated a bill in the last Session that would allow municipalities to set minimum wage locally but it never made it out of Committee.

Read more here.